Prayer in the School? Yes – No

I hesitate wading into this controversial subject but I see so many posts on Facebook calling for us to put prayer back in the schools and arguing that many of our problems are because prayer has been removed from the classroom.

Wondering which side is right, I decided to go where I always go when I need spiritual guidance or answers – to the Bible.

Here is what I discovered the Bible teaches.

  • Prayer and religious education is the responsibility of the parents and grandparents.

We see it first with Abraham.  When God selected Abraham to be the patriarch of God’s chosen people, the Israelites, one reason He gave was this:

I have singled him out so that he will direct his sons and their families to keep the way of the Lord by doing what is right and just

Later as the nation of Israel were given the Law they were told this:

Listen, O Israel! The Lord is our God, the Lord alone. And you must love the Lord your God with all your heart, all your soul, and all your strength. And you must commit yourselves wholeheartedly to these commands that I am giving you today. Repeat them again and again to your children. Talk about them when you are at home and when you are on the road, when you are going to bed and when you are getting up. Tie them to your hands and wear them on your forehead as reminders. Write them on the doorposts of your house and on your gates.

In Psalm 78 Asaph instructs the people of Israel that they should:

O my people, listen to my instructions.
    Open your ears to what I am saying,
    for I will speak to you in a parable.
I will teach you hidden lessons from our past—
    stories we have heard and known,
    stories our ancestors handed down to us.
We will not hide these truths from our children;
    we will tell the next generation
about the glorious deeds of the Lord,
    about his power and his mighty wonders.
For he issued his laws to Jacob;
    he gave his instructions to Israel.
He commanded our ancestors
    to teach them to their children,
so the next generation might know them—
    even the children not yet born—
    and they in turn will teach their own children.
So each generation should set its hope anew on God,
    not forgetting his glorious miracles
    and obeying his commands.

The New Testament confirmed this belief that the parents are the ones to teach their children about God.

In Ephesians Paul tells us:

ye fathers, provoke not your children to wrath: but bring them up in the nurture and admonition of the Lord.

Paul commended Timothy’s faith and noted that it was a result of his mother and grandmother’s faith.

To Timothy, my dearly beloved son: Grace, mercy, and peace, from God the Father and Christ Jesus our Lord.  I thank God, whom I serve from my forefathers with pure conscience, that without ceasing I have remembrance of thee in my prayers night and day; Greatly desiring to see thee, being mindful of thy tears, that I may be filled with joy; When I call to remembrance the unfeigned faith that is in thee, which dwelt first in thy grandmother Lois, and thy mother Eunice; and I am persuaded that in thee also.

  • The other place the Bible indicates where prayer should be is in the church.

Isaiah stated that God’s house should be a house of prayer.

Even them will I bring to my holy mountain, and make them joyful in my house of prayer: their burnt offerings and their sacrifices shall be accepted upon mine altar; for mine house shall be called a house of prayer for all people.

Jesus confirmed this when he said:

And said unto them, It is written, My house shall be called the house of prayer; but ye have made it a den of thieves.

The Book of Acts tells us that the church began when the disciples were gathered together in prayer.

And when they were come in, they went up into an upper room, where abode both Peter, and James, and John, and Andrew, Philip, and Thomas, Bartholomew, and Matthew, James the son of Alphaeus, and Simon Zelotes, and Judas the brother of James.  These all continued with one accord in prayer and supplication, with the women, and Mary the mother of Jesus, and with his brethren.

Questions that come to my mind when I see this cry for prayer in the school.

  • What would happen if we had more prayer in our homes and in our churches?
  • How much time do those crying for prayer in the school actually spend praying for our schools, for our teachers, the students?

I’m not saying I’m against prayer in our schools.  But like it or not, we are a multi-cultural nation now.  So – if we put prayer back in schools, who will be leading the prayer?  To what god will they be praying?

And now to really get some readers upset, what about all these prayer breakfasts we have?  I have been to several but quit going a few years ago.  I went expecting that we would pray.  Instead, we had special singers, a special speaker, a meal – and yes we did have a couple of people say a short prayer.  The emphasis was more on breakfast than on prayer.

  • What if we called for a prayer breakfast where we spent a few minutes eating a simple breakfast and then actually prayed?

Join me in praying for our schools and our teachers:

Lord, Grant our teachers an abundance of Your wisdom. Prepare their hearts to welcome and love our loved ones, and may we make sure to show them love and respect in return. Give them grace as they help students who aren’t thriving, courage to say what needs to be said, tools and knowledge on how and when to speak love, and strength when they feel weak. When they feel unseen, remind them that no moment goes unnoticed. They are shaping the future in one million small – yet incredibly important – ways every day. We are overwhelmed with gratitude for the gift of learning they share with our children. Bless them, Lord, and may they see even just a glimpse of how their faithfulness will forever impact generations to come.

And our children:

Bless our children and keep them safe from physical harm. Protect them from abuse, abduction, child trafficking, and addiction. Guard their hearts from the devil’s schemes, and protect their minds from things that are not appropriate for their eyes to see and their ears to hear. Bless them with hearts of compassion for their fellow students and teachers.  May they be kind on the playground and quiet in the hallways. Protect our children from gossip and bullying. May they know and hear Your voice louder than all the others.  Godly friends are important, and we pray today that You bless our children with those friends. May their friendships be innocent and light, and may the be filled with kindness, understanding, and compassionate consideration for one another.